Fly

Flies are classified as order Diptera, which mean two wings. The insects in this order have only one pair of membranous flying wings. The second pair of wings are reduced to small knobs, called halteres , for the purpose of balancing. Their body is relatively soft and hairy. They have a pair of large compound eyes, a pair of very short antennae and a sucking mouth.

Members in this order are strong flier. They are active in day time but some are active at night. Most species with external digestion, foods are liquidized by their enzymes before suck up by their sucking mouths. Some species, like the mosquitoes, pierce the prey skin with their sharp mouthparts and suck up the blood.

Flies develop by complete metamorphosis with four stages, i.e., eggs, larva, pupa and adult. Their larvae are known as maggots. Usually there are four larval instars. In some species, females deposit live larvae. Larvae in this order do not have legs and most of their heads reduced to very simple form.

There are several species in Australia such as: Blowflies, Bush Flies, Crane Flies, Dolichopodid Flies, Flesh Flies, Fruit Flies, Horse Flies, March Flies and Hover Flies.

Ecologistics will conduct a thorough inspection of your home or business top to bottom. If you have an infestation we will provide you with strategies for: Extermination and Prevention.

fly

Fly Species

Get a Free Quote Today

Mosquito

Mosquitoes are small, midge-like flies which compose the family Culicidae. Females of most species are ectoparasites, whose tube-like mouthparts (called a proboscis) pierce the hosts’ skin to consume blood. The word “mosquito” (formed by mosca and diminutive ito) is Spanish for “little fly”. Thousands of species feed on the blood of various kinds of hosts, mainly vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and even some kinds of fish. Some mosquitoes also attack invertebrates, mainly arthropods. Though the loss of blood is seldom of any importance to the victim, the saliva of the mosquito often causes an irritating rash that is a serious nuisance. Much more serious though, are the roles of many species of mosquitoes as vectors of diseases. In passing from host to host, some transmit extremely harmful infections such as malaria, yellow fever, west nile virus, dengue fever, filariasis, and other arboviruses, rendering it the deadliest animal in the world.

Mosquitoes are members of a family of nematocerid flies: the Culicidae (from the Latin culex, genitive culicis, meaning “midge” or “gnat”). Superficially, mosquitoes resemble crane flies (family Tipulidae) and chironomid flies (family Chironomidae). In particular, the females of many species of mosquitoes are blood-eating pests and dangerous vectors of diseases, whereas members of the similar-looking Chironomidae and Tipulidae are not. Many species of mosquitoes are not blood eaters and of those that are, many create a “high to low pressure” in the blood to obtain it and do not transmit disease. Also, in the bloodsucking species, only the females suck blood. Furthermore, even among mosquitoes that do carry important diseases, neither all species of mosquitoes, nor all strains of a given species transmit the same kinds of diseases, nor do they all transmit the diseases under the same circumstances; their habits differ. For example, some species attack people in houses, and others prefer to attack people walking in forests. Accordingly, in managing public health, knowing which species, even which strains, of mosquitoes with which one is dealing is important.

Over 3,500 species of mosquitoes have already been described from various parts of the world. Some mosquitoes that bite humans routinely act as vectors for a number of infectious diseases affecting millions of people per year. Others that do not routinely bite humans, but are the vectors for animal diseases, may become disastrous agents for zoonosis of new diseases when their habitats are disturbed, for instance by sudden deforestation.

There are several species in Australia such as: Asian Tiger Mosquito, Dengue Mosquito, Brown House Mosquito or Culicidae family.

Ecologistics will conduct a thorough inspection of your home or business top to bottom. If you have an infestation we will provide you with strategies for: Extermination and Prevention.

Mosquito

Mosquito Species

Get a Free Quote Today

Wasps

A wasp is any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is neither a bee nor an ant. This means that wasps are paraphyletic with respect to bees and ants, and that all three groups are descended from a common ancestor; the Apocrita form a clade.

The most commonly known wasps such as yellow jackets and hornets are in the family Vespidae and are eusocial, living together in a nest with an egg-laying queen and non-reproducing workers. Eusociality is favoured by the unusual haplodiploid system of sex determination in Hymenoptera, as it makes sisters exceptionally closely related to each other. However, the majority of wasp species are solitary, with each adult female living and breeding independently. Many of the solitary wasps are parasitoidal, meaning that they raise their young by laying eggs on or in the larvae of other insects. The wasp larvae eat the host larvae, eventually killing them. Solitary wasps parasitize almost every pest insect, making wasps valuable in horticulture for biological pest control of species such as whitefly in tomatoes and other crops.

Wasps first appeared in the fossil record in the Jurassic, and diversified into many surviving superfamilies by the Cretaceous. They are a successful and diverse group of insects with tens of thousands of described species; wasps have spread to all parts of the world except for the polar regions. The largest social wasp is the Asian giant hornet, at up to 5 centimetres (2.0 in) in length; among the largest solitary wasps is the giant scoliid of Indonesia, Megascolia procer. The smallest wasps are solitary chalcid wasps in the family Trichogrammatidae, some of which are just 0.2 millimetres (0.008 in) in length.

Wasps play many ecological roles. Some are predators, whether to feed themselves or to provision their nests. Many, notably the cuckoo wasps, are kleptoparasites, laying eggs in the nests of other wasps. With their powerful stings and conspicuous warning coloration, often in black and yellow, wasps are frequent models for Batesian mimicry by non-stinging insects, and are themselves involved in mutually beneficial Müllerian mimicry of other distasteful insects including bees and other wasps. Wasps have appeared in literature from Classical times, as the eponymous chorus of old men in Aristophanes’ 422 BC comedy Σφῆκες (Sphēkes), The Wasps, and in science fiction from H. G. Wells’s 1904 novel The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth, featuring giant wasps with three inch long stings. The name “Wasp” has been used for many warships and other military equipment.

There are several species in Australia such as: Braconid Wasps, Flower Wasps ,Gasteruptiid Wasps ,Ichneumon Wasps, Mud-Dauber, Sand Wasps or Paper Wasps, Potter Wasps.

Ecologistics will conduct a thorough inspection of your home or business top to bottom. If you have an infestation we will provide you with strategies for: Extermination and Prevention.

wasp

Wasps Species

Get a Free Quote Today

Bees

Bees are flying insects closely related to wasps and ants, known for their role in pollination and, in the case of the best-known bee species, the European honey bee, for producing honey and beeswax. Bees are a monophyletic lineage within the superfamily Apoidea, presently considered as a clade Anthophila. There are nearly 20,000 known species of bees in seven to nine recognized families, though many are undescribed and the actual number is probably higher. They are found on every continent except Antarctica, in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants.

Some species including honey bees, bumblebees, and stingless bees live socially in colonies. Bees are adapted for feeding on nectar and pollen, the former primarily as an energy source and the latter primarily for protein and other nutrients. Most pollen is used as food for larvae. Bee pollination is important both ecologically and commercially; the decline in wild bees has increased the value of pollination by commercially managed hives of honey bees.

Bees range in size from tiny stingless bee species whose workers are less than 2 millimetres (0.08 in) long, to Megachile pluto, the largest species of leafcutter bee, whose females can attain a length of 39 millimetres (1.54 in). The most common bees in the Northern Hemisphere are the Halictidae, or sweat bees, but they are small and often mistaken for wasps or flies. Vertebrate predators of bees include birds such as bee-eaters; insect predators include beewolves and dragonflies.

Human beekeeping or apiculture has been practised for millennia, since at least the times of Ancient Egypt and Ancient Greece. Apart from honey and pollination, honey bees produce beeswax, royal jelly and propolis. Bees have appeared in mythology and folklore, again since ancient times, and they feature in works of literature as varied as Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Mrs Tittlemouse, W. B. Yeats’s poem The Lake Isle of Innisfree, and Laline Paull’s The Bees. Bee larvae are included in the Javanese dish botok tawon, where they are eaten steamed with shredded coconut.

There are several species in Australia such as: European honey bee, Bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) or Asian honey bee (Apis cerana).

Ecologistics will conduct a thorough inspection of your home or business top to bottom. If you have an infestation we will provide you with strategies for: Extermination and Prevention.

bee

Bees Species

Get a Free Quote Today

Areas we service

Get a Free Quote Today

0419 277 717 | (02) 9797 0322

Pest ControlSub Floor VentilationMould RemovalPreventionShopOther